Tag Archives: 5K

How to Run a 5K in 30 Minutes Without Stopping

Eight weeks have passed and you’re finally an Ease Into 5K Graduate. But there are still two aspects of your running you want to improve: you actually want to run a 5K in 30 minutes, and without stopping. If your progress seemed to plateau in the last couple of weeks and your personal best is far from the 30 minutes, you’re not alone.

In fact, this is a major concern for those who end a 5K training program. And for those in doubt: Yes. It’s possible to run a 5K in 30 minutes without stopping! But it requires work, some adjustments in your training program and even a few tweaks to your diet!

If you have your eyes set on a longer distance, like a 10K, pick up where the 5K app leaves off and get to running a 10K with Bridge to 10K.

Make sure you take the following tips into consideration while training:

Speed Workouts


One fun way to improve your PR is by adding some interval training.
If you prefer to train in a running track, you can run a lap at your 5K pace, and then, a slower, easier recovery lap.

If you are running on the road, you can use lamp posts to mark intervals. After warm-up, try sprinting from one lamp to the next, followed by a lamp-to-lamp slower run. Repeat the pattern until you’ve covered a mile.

Hill training

To run faster you need to build up speed and endurance. Hill running is an excellent exercise because it builds up your leg muscle strength, helps your aerobic capacity, your stride length, and of course, your running technique.

And how about adding some speed training to hill running? You can run up a hill at a high speed and on your way down do some easy jogging or just walk.

Don’t start too fast


Endurance is an important aspect of a faster 5K. You need to run at a “conversational pace”, meaning you can talk, finishing your sentences while you’re running.

If you find yourself out of breath, just slow down, without stopping. As you increase your endurance, you’ll be able to pick up your pace; but to start, just focus on increasing your distance.

Posture & Breathing

Your posture is very important while running. Keep in mind: shoulders back. If you tend to lean forward, it’s harder to breathe. With an upright posture, you’ll breathe more efficiently. Don’t forget your arms must be at a 90-degree angle as you use them to move propel yourself forward.

One of the reasons why runners tend to stop and walk while training can be from side stitches. To prevent this, you need to avoid shallow breathing. Breathe in through your nose and breathe out through your mouth when you’re running. Don’t forget: breathe deeply from your belly, not your chest which allows you to take in more air.

Nutrition and Rest


A good balanced diet is important if you have a training routine. Make sure you incorporate carbohydrates, protein and both saturated and unsaturated fat into your diet. You can also keep a food diary and do some research on healthy recipes that will provide fuel for training and recovery.

Speaking of recovery, rest is very important to prevent any injury. Make sure you take at least one day off each week. Your muscles will appreciate the day off because they build and repair themselves during rest days.

Are you already running a 5K in 30 minutes? Share with the community how you accomplished this goal!

How to beat your 5K PR

You’ve been running regularly for some time and have completed a few 5K races. Now what? A new running goal is always a good idea. If you’re still not ready to race your first 10K, you might want to take your racing to the next level, by focusing on increasing your personal record.

Here are some tips for running faster 5K races:

Follow a 5K training plan

Follow a 5K training plan

To run faster and more efficiently, you might want to consider getting extra help. A friend who mastered several 5Ks, a personal trainer, a schedule, all these options are valid.

But if you’re used to running with your phone – that you use as a gps, music player or to take a few running selfies – Ease Into 5K might be the right training plan for you. Ease into 5K is a beginner’s running app that brings a new approach to training, more geared towards the needs of beginning runners and designed to provide lots of insights and motivation along the way.

By following a training schedule that’s specific for a 5K race, you’re more likely to see better results and improve your PR.

Add speed work

Speed workouts are essential for anyone who wants to run a faster 5K. If you’re aiming for a better PR, incorporate speed sessions into your training, including intervals where you sprint for short bursts of time.

Because sprinting can be hard on the body, make sure to start off with shorter sprints and gradually extend the length of time you feel comfortable running at an increased speed. For instance, you could start by adding sprints of 200m or 400m followed by an appropriate recovery period. As you get closer to race day, your body should be able to handle 800m or even 1km speed sessions.

Try some hill training

Try some hill training

To build up speed and develop muscle power, there’s nothing better than some short sharp hills. Hill running is great to strengthen up your leg muscles, increase your aerobic capacity and optimize your overall running technique.

Find a hill with a moderate slope (about six to 10 percent incline) that’s about 100-200 meters long. While running up the hill, keep your effort consistent and don’t let your running form fall apart. Recover by easy jogging or walking downhill backwards to avoid pressure on the knees.

To avoid injuries, incorporate hill training gradually. Start with 5-6 repeats and add another one each week, with a maximum of ten repeats.

Get stronger

A stronger runner is a faster runner. To become more powerful and more efficient, you need to strengthen the muscles that make you move.

Therefore, don’t skip the squats, planks, lunges, step-ups, calf raises and bent over rows. These exercises will target your shins, calves, quads, glutes, and core in order to make them stronger and injury-free.

Increase mileage

Increase mileage

To beat your current personal time, you will need to develop your endurance. You can accomplish that goal by regularly increasing your mileage every week.

Escalating the length of your longest run will improve your cardiovascular fitness and make you feel good about just running 5k on race day. Just make sure you don’t increase your mileage by more than 10% each week and remember you are aiming to run at a slower pace on long runs than your race pace.

How to become a Marathon Runner in 2015

At this time of year we all look back at our victories and fails of 2014 and set new goals that we hope to accomplish in 2015. If running a Marathon is on your bucket list, we want to help you cross it off in 2015!

That’s why we’ve just launched 5k to Marathon Progression Pack, an app bundle that contains the best training plan progression that will help you get to the starting line, even if you’ve never run before.

This bundle includes four apps already used by thousand to accomplish their workout goals: Ease into 5K, Bridge to 10K, Half Marathon Novice 1 and Marathon Novice 1.

5k to Marathon Progression Pack

After finishing these four training plans, you would have ran over 700 miles, spent 44 weeks training and you will be Marathon Ready.

Here’s how we’re planning to help you achieve your running goals in 2015:

Ease into 5K: from beginner to 5K racer.

Let’s be realistic. At this point, with no running experience, you’re not ready to race. You first need to build mobility and stability, while learning how to run without injuring yourself.

The best way to do this is with a run/walk interval program, such as Ease Into 5K. With our app you’ll start at a slower pace, but you will be running a full 5k without walking in just eight weeks.

This training program is excellent if you’re trying to adjust your busy schedule to a running routine. All you need is 30 minutes a day, 3 times a week to complete this training program.

Bridge to 10K: time to double your miles

Now that you can race a whole 5K, you’re ready to focus on increasing your running distance. Let’s make it 10K!

Bridge to 10K training program alternates between walking and running and is specifically designed for Ease into 5K app graduates. This training program demands a little more of your time – 3 times a week, from 53 to 70 minutes – but it will take you just 6 weeks of training to be able to complete a full 10K with no walking.

Half Marathon Novice 1: crushing your first 13.1

Running 13.1 miles is challenging. Before starting to train for a half marathon, you need to possess a basic fitness level which shouldn’t be a problem after the previous 14 weeks of training.

Based on Hal Higdon’s training plans, Half Marathon Novice 1 will get you ready to complete a half marathon in 12 weeks. To accomplish your running goal, you should run three days a week, cross train two days a week and allow your body to rest when scheduled. During this training program, you will be running two regular runs and one long run – 4 to 10 miles – each week.

The Half Marathon day is also the last day of this plan. After 14 weeks of training you’ll be able to get to the starting line with confidence, which will give you a feeling of great accomplishment.

Marathon Novice 1: you’re a marathoner

Completing a Half Marathon will really give you an idea of what you’re capable of and motivate you to keep going further. That’s exactly what you need at this stage because now it’s time to prepare for the big 26.2.

With Marathon Novice 1, you’ll train to reach this running goal in 18 weeks with the help of Hal Higdon’s running advice.

Of all four plans this is the most demanding. You’ll need to run four days a week and complete two regular runs and one long run, that ranges from 6 to 20 miles. The plan finishes with the Marathon race day and a goal crossed off from the 2015’s bucket list!


Download 5k to Marathon Progression Pack and get started today! Good luck with your training.

If you already own some of the the apps in the bundle, you just have to pay the difference to complete the bundle.